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Posted Friday, Jun 26, 2015 


The Music Academy's fifth annual Piano Festival comes to the Colburn School campus starting July 5. The festival culminates with the Steinway Concerto Competition on July 18, which carries a top prize of $1,500 and solo performance with the Pasadena Symphony on their 2016–2017 season.

The two-week event features master classes, lectures, and faculty and student recitals for 30 participants. Music Academy Dean Ory Shihor feels strongly about the value of this opportunity. "This is tremendous exposure for a young musician," Mr. Shihor said. "The chance to be featured in a performance with a lauded symphony, along with the monetary prize, is incredibly valuable to musicians on the cusp of professional careers."

Festival faculty represent some of the top conservatories and festivals in the world, including Oberlin Conservatory, Northwestern Conservatory, Boston University, San Francisco Conservatory, the University of Kansas, and the Colburn School's own Conservatory of Music and Music Academy.

The Steinway Concerto Competition is an evolution of the festival's annual competition. Sponsored in part by the Steinway Gallery of Beverly Hills, Metropolitan Associates, and the Pasadena Symphony, this year's competition includes a generous cash prize and a prestigious performance opportunity for the winner.

Students were selected through a competitive audition process requiring an application, a performance video, and a letter of recommendation from a professional musician.

Recitals and the Steinway Concerto Competition events are free and open to the public.

Results of the Steinway Concerto Competition will be announced July 19.

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Posted Monday, May 18, 2015 


With the close of the academic year, graduating seniors taking classes in the Music Academy will spend the next several months preparing for the next phase of their professional development: college and conservatory music study. This year's graduates will attend schools across the United States, including many of the top music programs in the country.

"This is such an important moment for our students," said Music Academy Dean Ory Shihor. "All the work they've put into their time at the Music Academy helped prepare them for this next step in their music education."

The Music Academy's program prepares talented pre-college musicians for conservatory-level training and careers as well-rounded musicians. The curriculum includes classes in music theory, chamber music, music history, and presentational skills, as well as private lessons. Many students have the opportunity to take master classes with visiting faculty. Last year's guest artists included violinist Laurent Korcia, violist Kim Kashkashian, and cellist Hans Jørgen Jensen.

Eleven students graduated from the Music Academy this year and will continue to develop their artistry at the Colburn Conservatory of Music, The Juilliard School, the Curtis Institute of Music, the Peabody Institute at The Johns Hopkins University, the University of Southern California, DePaul University, and the University of Michigan.

"All of the experiences I've had at the Colburn Music Academy have allowed me to grow as a musician and a performer, to take what I've accomplished in the practice room out onto the stage," said recent graduate Hannah Geisinger, a violist who will study at Juilliard in the fall. "This has been a groundbreaking experience for me."

As they reflect on their time at the Music Academy and prepare to move forward, these Colburn alumni have important advice for prospective students. "There's so much you can do with your time at the Colburn School and in Los Angeles," said violist Lauren Siess, also attending Juilliard this fall. "There are so many opportunities. Take advantage of all of them.

"We are so proud of our graduates and wish them all the best as they move forward," Mr. Shihor said.

A complete list of graduates and their destinations follows.

Cellist Katrina Agate, undecided at press time
Bassist Nicholas Arrendondo, Colburn Conservatory of Music
Clarinetist Wonchan Doh, The Juilliard School
Pianist Yi-Chen Feng, Peabody Institute of The Johns Hopkins University
Violist Hannah Geisinger, The Juilliard School, Kovner Fellow
Violist Mya Greene, University of Southern California
Cellist Oliver Herbert, Curtis Institute of Music
Violinist Alina Kobialka, DePaul University
Violist Lauren Siess, The Juilliard School, Kovner Fellow
Violinist Yu Chao Weng, University of Michigan
Violinist Mei Zhan, Peabody Institute of The Johns Hopkins University


Posted Friday, Apr 24, 2015 


Clarinetist Wonchan Doh, who studies with Yehuda Gilad, and cellist Oliver Herbert, who studies with Clive Greensmith, will perform solos as part of the final Academy Virtuosi concert of the season on April 28. Both students are in their senior year at the Colburn Music Academy.

The soloists were selected in the first annual Music Academy Concerto Competition, held in December. Current students auditioned for a committee of Music Academy faculty members in order to clinch the soloist spot for the spring semester Academy Virtuosi concert. The Academy Virtuosi is the Music Academy's conductorless chamber orchestra.

"We all felt this was an enriching opportunity for the students to experience what it is like to lead and perform a concerto without a conductor," said faculty member Margaret Batjer, who coaches the Academy Virtuosi. "We originally intended to have only one soloist, but at the audition there were clearly two students, Oliver and Wonchan, who were exceptional and deserved that opportunity."

Oliver will perform a Vivaldi concerto at Tuesday's performance, while Wonchan will perform the Stamitz clarinet concerto. "The chamber orchestra is also performing a wonderful Mendelssohn string symphony and Mozart's Adagio and Fugue, which they are playing so beautifully," Ms. Batjer added.

The concert will be Oliver and Wonchan's last performance as students of the Colburn Music Academy. In the fall, Wonchan will begin studies at the Juilliard School in New York City. Oliver will attend the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia. "They are both highly gifted musicians at this young age," Ms. Batjer said, "and having the opportunity to solo with the Academy Virtuosi will be a celebratory captstone to their Music Academy experience."

Music Academy Dean Ory Shihor agreed. "It has been a pleasure to work with Oliver and Wonchan. I expect great things from them in the future, and wish them all the very best in the next stage of their education."

Posted Friday, Apr 17, 2015 


Music Academy Students Yi Chen Feng and Andrew Zhao received first and second place in the solo competition, respectively, in the recent Virginia Waring International Piano Festival. Both Yi Chen and Andrew study with Myong-joo Lee at the Colburn School; Yi Chen also studies with Dean Ory Shihor.

"This is a major achievement for these students, taking the top prizes in this respective international competition," Mr. Shihor said. "I'm very proud of our young pianists and congratulate them on their recognition."

Yi Chen and Andrew competed against 22 teen musicians from Vancouver, San Francisco, New York, Honolulu, Melbourne, Beijing, and Taiwan. Six pianists advanced to the semifinals and only three to the final round. Considered one of the major competitions for young pianists in the United States, the judges evaluate each contestant on elegance, quality, and style.

Started in 1978 as a segment of a piano conference at the College of the Desert, the competition draws talented pianists from across the world to compete in solo and concerto rounds for juniors, age 12 and younger; intermediates, ages 13–17; and seniors, ages 18–35. It has been known as the Virginia Waring International Piano Competition since 2001, honoring the successful professional pianist who has supported the competition for many years.

The competition's goal is to provide young pianists through age 32 with performance opportunities. Contestants participate in both solo and concerto rounds as well as master classes in each age category. Winners have earned performance opportunities in Vienna, London, Rome, San Francisco, and Carnegie Hall in New York.

Posted Monday, Apr 13, 2015 


A select group of pre-college students from the Colburn School's Music Academy will take the stage in Thayer Hall on Saturday, April 18 at 5:30 pm for the Spring Recital.

Performing in the Spring Recital is a high honor for Music Academy students, and the program showcases months of hard work by both individual students and chamber groups. Musicians are carefully chosen by Music Academy faculty members based on their level of preparation, as well as previous performance opportunities.

"Students in the Music Academy have dedicated themselves to mastering their craft here at Colburn, and the Spring Recital represents a joyous culmination of the Spring Semester's hard work," said Music Academy Dean Ory Shihor. "I'm incredibly proud of all of this year's group of Academy students, and the Spring Recital is a beautiful exemplification of their commitment to learning and the high level of instruction provided by our faculty."

The recital will include a variety of solo and chamber works, including pieces by Chopin, Brahms, Schubert, Barber, Beethoven, and more.

Visit our website for more information about the Music Academy's Spring Recital. This event is free and open to the public.

Posted Monday, Mar 30, 2015 


Conservatory-bound pre-college aged musicians interested in rigorous training to help them reach their full artistic potential in adulthood must submit their application to the Colburn Music Academy by April 1.

Now in its fifth year, the Music Academy has proved a fruitful training ground for young musicians who seek an intensive education that prioritizes their passion for music. The Colburn School's program is unique because it emphasizes the importance of performance preparation, including special workshops and classes on presentation skills as well as numerous opportunities for public recitals.

"Our students find it very refreshing to be surrounded by peers who are as passionate and dedicated to their art as they are," said Music Academy Dean Ory Shihor. "Our school is an important environment for them. They can be themselves here. They can grow into accomplished adult musicians here."

Applicants must submit an online application form and $75 application fee to be considered for the Music Academy. Along with the formal application, prospective students must submit a digital prescreening video, along with a list of prior public performances, scholarships or prizes won, and a list of memorized solo repertoire, and a letter of recommendation from a professional musician.

Students selected to move on in the process will audition on May 1. This in-person audition gives faculty members important impressions about a student's readiness for study in the Music Academy's advanced program.

Some Music Academy students attend classes as day students, while others live on campus in the Colburn School residences in downtown Los Angeles. Students can opt to enroll in a nearby school or take classes online in order to complete their high school studies.

"It's a wonderful opportunity for a young musician," Mr. Shihor said. "The chance to dedicate one's self to fully to art at such a young age has a transformational effect on our musicians. They blossom right before our eyes.

Visit the Music Academy's webpage for complete information on applying for the 2015–2016 school year.

Posted Monday, Feb 16, 2015 


Music Academy Dean Ory Shihor is thrilled about the new opportunities for students at the annual Piano Festival competition, which will now offer a unique professional performance opportunity along with a sponsored cash prize. "This is tremendous exposure for a young musician," Mr. Shihor said. "The chance to be featured in a performance with a lauded symphony, along with the monetary prize, are incredibly valuable to musicians on the cusp of professional careers."

The inaugural Steinway Concerto Competition will be open to all participants of the music academy's annual Piano Festival, held each summer in July. This year's festival will highlight piano concerto literature as its centerpiece, allowing students to explore the defining characteristics of concertos through private lessons, master classes, lectures, performances, and theoretical studies.

Six finalists from among the entrants will advance to the Steinway Concerto Competition's final round. The first prize winner, selected from these finalists, will receive the $1,500 Steinway Prize and be presented in the Pasadena Symphony's 2016–2017 Classics Series at the Ambassador Auditorium with Music Director David Lockington. The first prize is presented in partnership with the Pasadena Symphony and generously sponsored by Steinway Gallery, Beverly Hills. Additional cash prizes for second and third place finalists will be sponsored by Metropolitan Associates through the generosity of Colburn School Board Member Alice Colombe. The awards will be $750 and $300, respectively.

The Piano Festival will be held July 5–19 on the Colburn School campus, and the event is open to all pre-college pianists aged 10–19, including graduating high school seniors who have not yet entered college. The festival gives young pianists access to two weeks of conservatory-level instruction for up to 30 students. Faculty for the festival will include Mr. Shihor as well as respected teachers from Oberlin Conservatory of Music, Boston University, the San Francisco Conservatory, and others.

"I remember competing myself when I was young," Mr. Shihor said. "When you take a step back and see it from the other side, as the organizer, it's so exciting to watch these young musicians fully embrace the spirit of doing their personal best. In that sense, everyone comes out ahead through this experience."

Visit this link for more information on the Steinway Piano Concerto Competition or the Music Academy Piano Festival.

Posted Friday, Jan 30, 2015 


"Today's musicians must be able to speak freely, with confidence, about themselves, the music, and to answer questions and engage with the audience," said Ory Shihor, dean of the Music Academy. For that reason, the music academy established regular Young Artist Performances to give prepared students the opportunity to appear on stage, not only to perform works, but to practice their stage presence skills.

Young Artist Performances happen twice monthly and give eight to 10 students the opportunity to perform. Music academy students present either a solo piece or play as part of a chamber ensemble. In order to be included in the program, however, students must apply and be approved by their instructor for consideration.

"Our students share a common dream of becoming professional musicians and are eager to share their love and passion for music with others," Mr. Shihor said. "They all work hard and can't wait to get on stage to perform."

The pre-college students of the music academy show incredible promise for a successful music career. Beyond the thrill of being on stage, students learn practical skills for their future. "Young musicians are seldom taught how to 'behave' on stage," Mr. Shihor explained, "including how to bow, how to dress, or even how to smile and make eye contact with the audience. All of this is just sort of expected of them."

To Mr. Shihor's knowledge, the music academy's class on presentation skills is the only one of its kind for young musicians. It is taught by lauded drama educator Debbie Devine.

Young Artist Performances also help students prepare for another significant career rite of passage: competitions and concerts outside the Colburn School campus.

The best part, Mr. Shihor says, is watching the students support and care for each other leading up to the performances. "You often see them encouraging each other backstage prior to performing," he said. "It is truly heartwarming to see."

The next Young Artist Performance will be Saturday, February 7. Visit our website for more information.

Posted Friday, Jan 9, 2015 


Among orchestral stringed instruments, the viola seems one of the most neglected by classical composers when considering existing solo repertoire—but all that will change if master violist Kim Kashkashian has anything to say about it.

In the early years of her career, Ms. Kashkashian came to realize she had many more opportunities to play works for viola in Europe than in America. In 2000, she explained the situations to Strings magazine: "Here, the viola is just beginning to be reluctantly respected as a solo instrument, while in Europe it is fully accepted."

In the late 1980s, she moved to Germany to pursue those opportunities and stayed for 13 years. However, an opportunity to teach with the New England Conservatory, where she remains on faculty, enticed her to come home. But the situation for the viola in America had not improved much. She remarked at the time, "American violists are still acting like missionaries and it's time for me to join the fight."

Ms. Kashkashian is counted among the most ardent advocates for the expansion of viola repertoire. Along with furthering viola technique, she has personally commissioned new solo and chamber works by many of the top contemporary composers. She relishes the opportunity to perform new work. "I feel that part of my job as a musician is to tell the news, to spread the word about what's going on in the musical world. It's our obligation, as well as a challenge and a pleasure, to work with the composers of the day."

Her advocacy and passion for new music was honored in 2013 with a Grammy award for Best Classical Instrumental Solo Album, featuring work by Hungarian composers Gyorgy Kurtag and Gyorgy Ligeti. The award energized violists everywhere.

"Kim Kashkashian is renowned for her interpretations of contemporary music," said Helen Callus, viola instructor in the Music Academy. "Her knowledge of this particular repertoire will be an invaluable experience for the students performing in her master class."

As a teacher, Ms. Kashkashian strives to impart both effective technique with artistic mastery. "The relationship between student and teacher is very personal, so it's important for a good partnership that we choose each other," she has said.

At the Colburn School, Ms. Kashkashian will work with music academy and conservatory students as part of a public master class.

Music Academy Master Class

January 15, 7 pm

Conservatory of Music Master Class

January 16, 6 pm

Posted Friday, Dec 5, 2014 


Music Academy Dean Ory Shihor remembers how much he loved performing as a young musician pursuing his education, so when it came time to design the Colburn School's program for pre-college musicians, he made sure performing was a cornerstone of the opportunities provided to students.

"They are performers at heart," Mr. Shihor said, speaking from his desk in the midst of preparations for the fall recital. "But you can't just play in your living room. You have to get out into the world. That's why they're here, to try out their material on audience."

Thirteen students were nominated by music academy faculty members for fall recital auditions. Nominations recognize the hardest working and most accomplished students of the term, with a panel of audition judges choosing the seven students or ensembles who will perform in the recital.

Performing involves more than just what the audience sees on stage. Music academy students work closely with faculty member Debbie Devine, an acting and presentational speaking coach, to learn about stage presence and public speaking. At the recital, each musician will talk to the audience about his or her relationship the piece to be performed, why it spoke to them, and what it means to them. Mr. Shihor noted there are many choices musicians make when performing, right down to what they'll wear on stage. Every step of it, he said, "is a kind of ritual" for the performer.

Mr. Shihor hopes the recital performers will feel the energy and appreciation of the audience, which inspires them to keep working hard. He believes performances like this are essential professional development opportunities for music academy students. "It's a critical part of their education, right down to the camaraderie among the performers for the concert."

The Music Academy Fall Recital will begin at 5:30 pm on Saturday, December 13. Visit our website for more information, including a roster of performers and program information.

Posted Wednesday, Nov 26, 2014 

Composer Eric Tanguy has become one of the most widely performed and broadcast composers of our time. On December 7, Mr. Tanguy will hear students of the Colburn Music Academy and Colburn Community School of Performing Arts perform his work when he visits the Kreston/Picken Colburn School performance class.

Mr. Tanguy teaches composition at the Conservatoire Paul Dukas in Paris and is a visiting professor in composition at the University of California, Los Angeles. He was educated at the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique in Paris, where he studied with Ivo Malec, Gérard Grisey, and Betsy Jolas.

"Eric is an exceptional composer," Ms. Kreston said. "Since he himself is a violinist, his work feels to me to be particularly well suited for the instrument, so our class is really fortunate to be able to learn from him in person."

Among Mr. Tanguy's compositions are many pieces for featuring violin, including the stand out Sonata breve for solo violin. Three of Ms. Kreston's students, Geneva Lewis, Sarah Kuo, and Hao Zhao will each perform one movement of that work. Mr. Tanguy has already worked with the three students on the sonata; afterward, he will speak to the class and audience about his work.

Ms. Kreston teaches in both the community school and the music academy. She welcomes other Colburn School students and parents to join them for this unique conversation. The student performance will begin at 11 am in Mayman Recital Hall on December 7.

Posted Friday, Nov 21, 2014 


The tradition of the conductorless orchestra stretches back to the very beginning of symphony history. The earliest orchestras were led by a concertmaster, often the harpsichordist or violinist, who initiated the ensemble's performances. Composers served as the earliest conductors, but the role evolved over time into the professional music director common today.

The Music Academy's string ensemble of talented pre-college musicians, the Academy Virtuosi, is a continuation of the orchestra's earliest heritage. Like those early orchestras, though, the Academy Virtuosi work with a professional concertmaster, Margaret Batjer of the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, who guides them in a coaching role through the special challenges of conductorless performance. "They have to learn to use their ears in a very sophisticated way," Ms. Batjer said. "Each member of the section from first to last chair has a much greater responsibility than when there is a conductor."

For the Academy Virtuosi, the opportunity to play under these circumstances is both empowering and educational. "It's a rare opportunity for students their age to play in an orchestra without a conductor," said Ory Shihor, dean of the Music Academy. "I don't know of many programs where young musicians get to perform this way."

Ms. Batjer draws from expertise gleaned from her mentors when she was a student and the wealth of experience developed at the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra. "I have worked with the students over the past 10 weeks on this program," she said. "Aubree, from the Concertmaster chair, as well as the other principals, have learned to lead the ensemble themselves physically and also musically by example. They have come so far in terms of understanding the nature of a conductorless ensemble as well as growing musically and technically with the program."

The Academy Virtuosi performance on Tuesday, November 25 will include selections from Vivaldi, Handel, Bach, Elgar, and Bartók. "Working with young musicians is one of my greatest passions," Ms. Batjer said. "Although I only began my work with the Virtuosi this year, I have seen such growth in all of them individually and collectively. I have enjoyed working with all of them very much."

Visit our website for more information on this event.

Posted Monday, Nov 3, 2014 

Three students from the Colburn Music Academy and four students from the Community School for Performing Arts advanced to the Semi-final Auditions of the national Young Artists Competition, hosted by the Mondavi Center at the University of California, Davis campus.

Cellist Jenny Bahk (Clive Greensmith), violist Ji Eun Park (Helen Callus), and violinist Hannah Song (Danielle Belen) of the music academy will move forward to the next round of competition. Violist Celia Daggy (Andrew Picken), violinist Geneva Lewis (Aimée Kreston), violist Emma Wernig (Andrew Picken), cellist Tracy Lang (Dr. Richard Naill, Ida Levin and Tina Qiu), and pianist Yoko Rosenbaum (Robert Thies) will move forward from the community school.

The annual competition invites pianists and instrumentalists between the ages of 12 and 17 to compete in the Young Artists Division. Students prepare a performance video for their preliminary application in order to receive an invitation to audition live in one of five cities. The Los Angeles Semi-final audition will be held on November 22.

The final auditions will be held in Davis on February 28 and March 1. The top two instrumentalists in the Young Artists Division will receive $1,500 and $500, respectively.

Posted Monday, Oct 27, 2014 

The Music Academy kicks off the new Guest Artist Series on October 30 with violinist Michelle Kim. Ms. Kim's residency will include a free public performance at 7 pm that evening. Click here to reserve a seat.

Ms. Kim serves as the assistant concertmaster for the New York Philharmonic and has made solo appearances with the Los Angeles Philharmonic and the Pacific and New Jersey Symphonies. She was a Presidential Scholar at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, DC, and first violinist of the Rossetti String Quartet. Her previous appointments include concertmaster with the New Hampshire Music Festival Orchestra, the Fresno Philharmonic, Santa Barbara Chamber Orchestra, and Asia America Symphony Orchestra. She teaches at Mannes College.

Guest artists provide Music Academy students with opportunities to study and collaborate with leading performers from across the country. During their residencies, guest artists will lead students in focused study during master classes and collaborate with students in performances. The Guest Artist Series is sponsored by Mr. and Mrs. Jingchao Ma.

Posted Monday, Oct 27, 2014 

Music Academy violinist Hannah Song placed 2nd in the Aspen Music Festival Concerto Competition for her performance of Mozart's 5th Violin Concerto. At 15 years old, she was one of the youngest musicians in the competition.

Hannah will be featured as the Discovery Artist for New West Symphony, soloing with the orchestra in five performances for thousands of elementary school students in Santa Monica, Thousand Oaks, and Oxnard.

Hannah studies with Danielle Belen in the Colburn Music Academy.

Click here for more information

Posted Wednesday, Aug 20, 2014 

It was announced today that Music Academy student Ray Ushikubo was awarded $50,000 as a 2014 Davidson Fellow Laureate. As the youngest recipient this year, Ushikubo was selected for his music project "Circle of Life in Music," which focuses on the relationship between the performer and his audience, and the teachers, parents, schools, and organizations that support them. The underlying theme of his project is that the performer brings happiness and joy to the audience, and their happiness in turn motivates the performer.

This isn't the first time a Colburn Music Academy student was named Davidson Fellow Laureate. In 2011, violinist Simone Porter was awarded the honor for her project "Performance as Soundtrack of Process and Identity," examining the progression of performance preparation, from the development of technique and interpretation, to the emergence of a professional identity.

Ray Ushikubo studies piano with Ory Shihor and violin with Robert Lipsett and Danielle Belen.

Learn More About His Impressive Accomplishment

Posted Wednesday, Jul 9, 2014 

Join us on Tuesday, July 15 for the Colburn Young Artists Academy’s Sonata Marathon Competition. The Colburn Young Artists Academy Piano Festival provides gifted, pre-college age pianists with two weeks of conservatory-level instruction at The Colburn School each summer. This year’s Festival includes 30 students from across the United States and abroad, including students from Australia, France, China, Japan, Taiwan, Thailand, Singapore and South Korea, and culminates on July 15 with a Sonata Marathon Competition. Students will compete for the $1000 Colburn Young Artists Academy Piano Festival Steinway Prize. The competition takes place in Thayer Hall at 3:30 pm. Free admission. Contact 213-621-4795 or theacademy@colburnschool.edu for more information.

Posted Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 

Be one of 30 young pianists from around the world to study at the Colburn Young Artists Academy Piano Festival this summer, July 2-16. This year’s festival will feature the wide-ranging piano sonata literature as its centerpiece, and will provide gifted, pre-college age pianists with two weeks of conservatory-level instruction. Additionally, students receive four 50-minute private lessons, and will participate in at least two master classes. Click here for information on how to apply.

Posted Wednesday, Jun 11, 2014 

Be one of 30 young pianists from around the world to study at the Colburn Young Artists Academy Piano Festival this summer, July 2-16. This year’s festival will feature the wide-ranging piano sonata literature as its centerpiece, and will provide gifted, pre-college age pianists with two weeks of conservatory-level instruction. Additionally, students receive four 50-minute private lessons, and will participate in at least two master classes. Click here for information on how to apply.

Posted Wednesday, Jun 4, 2014 

Be one of 30 young pianists from around the world to study at the Colburn Young Artists Academy Piano Festival this summer, July 2-16. This year’s festival will feature the wide-ranging piano sonata literature as its centerpiece, and will provide gifted, pre-college age pianists with two weeks of conservatory-level instruction. Additionally, students receive four 50-minute private lessons, and will participate in at least two master classes. Click here for information on how to apply.

Posted Wednesday, May 28, 2014 

Be one of 30 young pianists from around the world to study at the Colburn Young Artists Academy Piano Festival this summer, July 2 - 16. This year’s festival will feature the wide-ranging piano sonata literature as its centerpiece, and will provide gifted, pre-college age pianists with two weeks of conservatory-level instruction. Additionally, students receive four 50-minute private lessons, and will participate in at least two master classes. Click here for information on how to apply.

Posted Tuesday, May 20, 2014 

Be one of 30 young pianists from around the world and study at the Colburn Young Artists Academy Piano Festival this summer, July 2 - 16. This year’s festival will feature the wide-ranging piano sonata literature as its centerpiece, and will provide gifted, pre-college age pianists with two weeks of conservatory-level instruction. Additionally, students receive four 50-minute private lessons, and will participate in at least two master classes. Click here for information on how to apply.

Posted Wednesday, May 14, 2014 

Study at the Colburn Young Artists Academy Piano Festival this summer, July 2-16. Click here for information on how to apply.

Posted Tuesday, May 6, 2014 

Study at the Colburn Young Artists Academy Piano Festival this summer, July 2-16. Click here for information on how to apply.

Posted Wednesday, Apr 30, 2014 

Study at the Colburn Young Artists Academy Piano Festival this summer, July 2-16. Click here for information on how to apply.

Posted Wednesday, Apr 30, 2014 

Celebrate the year's end with an evening of solo and chamber music featuring students from the Colburn Young Artists Academy on Saturday, May 3 at 7 pm in Thayer Hall. Music by Beethoven, Rachmaninoff, Saint-Saëns and more. Free admission. For more information, click here.

Posted Wednesday, Apr 23, 2014 

Study at the Colburn Young Artists Academy Piano Festival this summer, July 2-16. Visit www.colburnschool.edu/academyfestival for information on how to apply.

Posted Wednesday, Apr 23, 2014 

Celebrate the year's end with an evening of solo and chamber music featuring students from the Colburn School's Young Artists Academy on Saturday, May 3 at 7 pm in Thayer Hall. Music by Beethoven, Rachmaninoff, Saint-Saëns and more. Free admission. For more information, click here.

Posted Wednesday, Apr 16, 2014 

Study at the Colburn Young Artists Academy Piano Festival this summer, July 2-16. 

Visit www.colburnschool.edu/academyfestival for information on how to apply.

Posted Wednesday, Apr 9, 2014 

Study at the COLBURN Young Artists Academy PIANO FESTIVAL this summer, July 2-16. 

Visit www.colburnschool.edu/academyfestival for information on how to apply.

Colburn Academy Student with violin scroll

Music Academy

Colburn Academy Student with cello

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